Ways to Present the Business Model Canvas

The Business Model Canvas is a fantastic method of brainstorming and documenting the business model for your startup or operating business. Unfortunately, when attempting to present a business model to stakeholders, employees, or investors, many founders and business leaders simply display their canvas and explain the content to the audience. This is a poor method of sharing information which will ultimately leave the audience confused and overwhelmed.

nn

Benson Garner from the Strategyzer team (the maintainers of the Business Model Canvas) recently hosted a webinar describing the dos and don’ts of effectively presenting the canvas. The webinar is available online. Below I will outline Garner’s key points. For more detail, please view the 40 minute webinar. It explains these points in detail, plus offers a great example of generating and presenting a canvas.

nn

First, presenting a business model canvas directly may be the worst way to present the content. If the audience has no understanding or awareness of the canvas or the methodology for generating one, they will be unlikely to understand your presentation. In this case, think of other ways to present the content in a more traditional style. If you are convinced that presenting the information in canvas format is best, at least give an overview of the Business Model Canvas before you present.

nn

Presentation Killers

nn

Or ways to sink your business model canvas presentation.

nn

    n

  1. n

    Revealing the canvas all at once at the start of the presentation. Audience members will be overwhelmed and spend too much time reading your canvas rather than listening to your speech.

    n

  2. n

  3. n

    Including too much detail and text. A common flaw amongst all presentations.

    n

  4. n

  5. n

    Including too many ideas on a single canvas. Consider using multiple canvases to present separate ideas, and present each canvas alone.

    n

  6. n

  7. n

    Showing elements that are not linked to other elements (orphan elements). For example, a Value Proposition for a Customer Segment, but without an associated Revenue Stream.

    n

  8. n

  9. n

    Mixing the present and future state. As above, consider using separate canvases; one for the present business and another for the future.

    n

  10. n

  11. n

    Sharing too much irrelevant info. The audience is likely to ask questions or for clarification. Keep answers brief and related to the information you are presenting. Avoid going far off-tangent.

    n

  12. n

nn

Killer Presentations

nn

Or how to properly present a business model canvas

nn

    n

  1. n

    Tell the story, one element at a time. Ensure the story has a clear beginning and end, separated by rising suspense.

    n

  2. n

  3. n

    Use arrows to show relationships between elements. For example, use an arrow to show how your business will deliver a Value Proposition through a Channel to a Customer.

    n

  4. n

  5. n

    Use colour-coding to show relationships between elements.

    n

  6. n

  7. n

    Use a few descriptive words, and don’t be afraid to use visuals. For example, include a picture of a smiling face in a Value Proposition of “Better Smiles”.

    n

  8. n

  9. n

    Distinguish between assumptions and facts (i.e. what you know vs what you don’t).

    n

  10. n

  11. n

    Bring in relevant multimedia content (e.g. videos, images, charts).

    n

  12. n

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *